Deserted places poem

One must as well continually marvel forever with the essence like Mozart. The woods around it have it—it is theirs. He explains that no matter what kind of loneliness snow may present, he can beat even that.

I think that the snow might represent conformity or most likely, death. He feels powerless in that aspect, against the decend of the elemets. Once again, the effect is not "put on from without," not a flourish of craft, but a feat of technique.

The purpose it serves seems primarily mechanical. Halfway through the poem, then, the narcotic aspect of the snowfall is predominant, and the vowel music is like a dulled pulse beat: But it is not just the snow but "night" as well.

The open space is surrounded by woods that "have it. One cannot find meaning satisfying enough as we do with lesser poets because comprehension alone relegates his poem to the past.

This may only be an flaggyanalysis of the writing. And where does that line about being "too absent-spirited to count" arrive from. He was very much disheartened to be able to count the number of these animals. The speaker was in the grip of a blank fear and spiritual exhaustion which is neither explicable nor has an outlet.

However, whereas Frost comments on the snow and how it represents loneliness, he sadly holds the "trump" winning card.

Desert Places Summary

Semantically, the difference is related to two conflicting needs: The reason that Frost uses these two aspects of nature to describe loneliness is because when a person is lonely they tend to also be a bit depressed and sad.

Though there is still stresses on the loneliness of man, it gives a different impression of the poem. The analogy between man and nature appears operative, but the reciprocal relation is negative rather than positive; pluralistic rather than monistic; fragmented in its stress on aloneness rather than unified; deadly rather than life-supporting.

And I took measures accordingly I have myself all in a strong box" SL The woods around are also snow covered, as they should be. His is not yet a "mind of winter," for he can still think about having one, fear that he might discover it if he explores inside himself. The figure in "Desert Places,".

But in the next eight lines we go through the nature barrier, as it were, into the ether of symbolic knowledge. Does it mean that the speaker does not matter.

For Wordsworth, and for many subsequent romantic writers including Emerson, the analogy between states of mind or dispositions of the spirit and the sympathetic universe was uplifting because it implied, or rather presupposed, an active positive alliance, a radical continuity, through God, between man and nature.

Does it mean that the speaker does not matter. He goes rapidly past a field, awed by the swift descent of snow and night and disheartened by the smooth white cover over the last traces of vegetation, which presents a temptation to yield, as does much else in the scene, for everything seems gathered in.

Frost indicates that it will get worse before it gets better: Frost admits that he is already frightened by the "desert places" that live within him every day; by comparison to those places, the world of snow is no match for his reality.

Following on this contrast is another: Understand that Frost himself is trapped in his home and it is there that he observes the activities of nature. For Wordsworth, and for many subsequent romantic writers including Emerson, the analogy between states of mind or dispositions of the spirit and the sympathetic universe was uplifting because it implied, or rather presupposed, an active positive alliance, a radical continuity, through God, between man and nature.

Remove the signs of man's involvement, and it straightway ceases to be "for once, then, something" and can only be identified negatively: Yes he may be in the woods but he's talking about how lonely he is.

At present the field is not entirely blanketed; instead, the speaker observes. It is necessary to shift the focus from the poet himself back to the scene before him in preparation for the final statement in the last stanza. Because it is with blankness that he identifies, it presents no escape, only a reminder of self, a self that is not a welcome haven or wellspring.

Desert places visible in between stars can't "scare" the poet or the speaker in the poem more than his own inner emptiness--"my own desert place." The poet-speaker is overtaken by a sense of fear when he sees the vast gulf between the eternity and the small space (that also deserted one) that he fills in.

The title of Robert Frost’s poem “Desert Places” is particularly intriguing. We normally think of “desert places” as vast areas of dry sand baked under the blistering heat of the sun.

Judith Oster. This later poem makes a fitting companion piece to "Stopping by Woods." Even the rhyme scheme (aaba) is the same, although in this poem, the poet has not chosen to commit himself to the greater difficulty of linking his stanzas by means of rhyme.

In Robert Frost's poem, "Desert Places," the symbolism used seems to be that of nature, specifically snow, to represent a separateness or loneliness as the world becomes covered, blanketing not. The entire poem is an objective correlative for the last line. The ‘desert places’ are within and without, and Frost conveys this by both image and the sound of his4/5(11).

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Desert places visible in between stars can't "scare" the poet or the speaker in the poem more than his own inner emptiness--"my own desert place." The poet-speaker is overtaken by a sense of fear when he sees the vast gulf between the eternity and the small space (that also deserted one) that he fills in.

Deserted places poem
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Seamus Heaney: On "Desert Places" | Modern American Poetry